Understanding your Land Tax Assessment

Where can I find information on the changes to land tax?

Please see the land tax changes page to see what changes apply to you.

What rates are used to calculate land tax?

You can find the 2020-21 land tax rates on our Rates and Thresholds page.

The rates and thresholds in 2020-21 are different for land held on trust. More information about trust rates can be found on the Rates and Thresholds page . Information about trusts can be found on the Land Held on Trusts page.

Why have I received a Land Tax Assessment?

The use, site value and ownership of land each year at 30 June determines your land tax payable.

If the combined site value of your taxable land is over the $450,000 threshold (or $25,000 for land held on trust), you are likely to receive a Land Tax Assessment.

Changes to the way land held in different ownerships is grouped for assessment, starting in the 2020-21 financial year, may mean you receive a Land Tax Assessment where you might not have received one before.

Why is this the first time I have received a Land Tax Assessment?

You could have received a Land Tax Assessment for the first time for any of the reasons listed below:

  • The total taxable site value of land owned by you (and not held on trust) at 30 June now exceeds $450,000.
  • The total taxable site value of land held on trust, owned by you at 30 June now exceeds $25,000.
  • You have bought additional land in the last financial year.
  • Land previously exempt from land tax no longer meets the exemption criteria.
  • Your land is held across more than one ownership. An ownership consists of all the properties owned by the same owner or the identical group of owners.
  • You are recorded as a beneficiary or unitholder for taxable land held on trust.

Why is my home included on my Land Tax Assessment? Shouldn’t this be exempt?

If your home was already exempt from land tax, as your ‘principal place of residence’, your exemption continues and the land will not be liable for land tax.

The new Land Tax Assessment now lists all South Australian property that you own, or partly own, including land that is exempt from land tax. Previous Land Tax Notice of Assessments only listed taxable land.

On your Statement of land held (which is the last page of your Assessment), you will see a code next to your home’s details in the ‘Site Value’ column showing if it is exempt from land tax. If we have recorded it as your home (‘principal place of residence’), you will see the code ‘PPR’.

Highlighting principal place of residence exemption on statement of land

If a site value is displayed, an exemption has not been applied or partial exemption may have been applied. This means that land tax has been assessed against the land.

If you only receive a partial exemption, the value shown in the ‘Site Value’ column will reflect the proportion of the site value that attracts land tax. The partial exemption will noted below the property description.

Highlighting principal place of residence partial exemption on statement of land

If your home does not currently have a principal place of residence exemption in place, please see our land tax exemption page for details on the principal place of residence exemption and how to apply.

I have a deduction on my Land Tax Assessment. What is that and how is it calculated?

Where you own land jointly with another or others, the jointly owned land will be assessed firstly in the joint ownership.

You will then also be assessed individually on your share of the jointly owned land, along with any other land you own, or partly own. This is new from the 2020-21 financial year.

To stop you being taxed again on land that attracts land tax in the joint ownership, you will receive a deduction to offset your individual land tax. The deduction is taken off the total of your individual land tax.

The deduction is equal to your share of the land tax charged to land in the joint ownership. If land tax is not applied in the joint owners (for example total site value is under the threshold), a deduction will not be available.

Where your total deduction is greater than your individual land tax liability, your land tax is reduced to zero and you will not receive a Land Tax Assessment on your individual holding.

I’m having difficulty paying. What should I do?

Payment by four quarterly instalments is provided for land tax. If you wish to organise a payment arrangement, please contact RevenueSA on 8226 3750 (option 2) before the due date on your Land Tax Assessment.

Why is the same property showing on more than one Land Tax Assessment?

Where you own land jointly with another, or others, it may appear on more than one Land Tax Assessment.  This is as a result of changes to the way jointly owned land is assessed, which was introduced from the 2020-21 financial year.

It means that where land is own by joint owners, it will be firstly assessed in the joint ownership, and a Land Tax Assessment will be issued if land tax is applicable.

Individual owners will also be assessed on their share of jointly owned land, along with any other land that they own, or partly own, and a Land Tax Assessment will be issued if land tax is applicable. Partly owned land is identified under the property location details on your individual assessment.

Highlighting share of property owned on statement of land


If land tax is payable in the joint ownership, a deduction will be offset against your individual liability. This will be reflected in the ‘Deduction' column on your Statement of land held.

Highlighting deduction on statement of land


Where your total deduction is greater than your individual land tax liability, your land tax is reduced to zero and you will not receive a Land Tax Assessment on your individual holding.

My Land Tax Assessment shows land I own with others – have I been taxed twice?

No, if you own land jointly with other people, you may see the property appear on 2 Land Tax Assessments (the joint ownership and your individual ownership), but you have not been taxed twice.

Taxable land you own with others will be assessed in the joint ownership and an Assessment may be issued to the joint owners.

Your share in the land will also be assessed along with any taxable land you own or partly own and a deduction of your share of the land tax paid in the joint ownership will apply. An Assessment may be issued to your individual ownership which will show all land that you own or partly own.

I own a property jointly with someone. We received a joint Land Tax Assessment and I received an individual Land Tax Assessment, but they didn’t receive anything. Why is that?

There are two main reasons that one owner could receive an individual Land Tax Assessment, while another owner does not.

One owner may not receive a Land Tax Assessment for either of these reasons:

  1. The deduction they receive offsets their individual land tax liability in full.
  2. The combined site value of taxable land they own, or partly own is below the land tax threshold .

I own land jointly, but don’t have a deduction showing on my individual Land Tax Assessment. Why is that?

A deduction will only apply when land tax is applicable in the joint ownership. If a deduction does not appear on your individual Land Tax Assessment, this means that no land tax has been applied in the joint ownership, most likely as the combined taxable site value is below the minimum land tax threshold.

How is land tax assessed for owners who own land jointly with another?

Land owned by joint owners, will be firstly assessed in the joint ownership, and a Land Tax Assessment will be issued if land tax is applicable.

Individual owners will also be assessed on their share of jointly owned land, along with any other land that they own, or partly own, and a Land Tax Assessment will be issued if land tax is applicable. Partly owned land is identified under the property location details on your individual assessment.

Highlighting share of property owned on statement of land

If land tax is payable in the joint ownership, a deduction will be offset against your individual liability. This will be reflected in the ‘- Deduction” column on your Statement of land held.

Highlighting deduction on statement of land

Where your total deduction is greater than your individual land tax liability, your land tax is reduced to zero and you will not receive a Land Tax Assessment on your individual holding.


Example

Chau and Dai Nguyen own land together. They each have an equal share. Their joint Land Tax Assessment shows their jointly owned land:

  • 1 Alpha Street, site value of $500,000
  • 14 Bett Road, site value $600,000

Example of statement of land for joint ownership

Chau’s individual Land Tax Assessment shows her half of the jointly owned land, plus the other land she owns in her own right:

  • 1 Alpha Street - 50% share of ownership #123456 Chau and Dai Nguyen, site value of $250,000 (half of the total site value of the property)
  • 14 Bett Road, 50% share of ownership #123456 Chau and Dai Nguyen, site value of $300,000 (half of the total site value of the property)
  • 9 Soup Lane, site value of $700,000

Chau receives a deduction for her share of the land tax applied to the joint ownership, but it doesn’t completely wipe out her individual land tax.
She will receive a Land Tax Assessment on her site value of $250,000 + $300,000 + $700,000 (with a deduction for her share of the land tax applied to the joint ownership on the jointly owned properties).

Example of statement of land for individual ownership

Dai does not own any land in his own right. His properties would show as:

  • 1 Alpha Street, 50% share of ownership #123456 Chau and Dai Nguyen, site value of $250,000 (half of the total site value of the property)
  • 14 Bett Road, 50% share of ownership #123456 Chau and Dai Nguyen, site value of $300,000 (half of the total site value of the property)

Dai receives a deduction for his share of the land tax applied to the joint ownership. In his case, it completely offsets his individual land tax.

Dai does not receive an individual Land Tax Assessment.


Why is my exempt primary production land showing on my Land Tax Assessment?

If your land was already exempt from land tax, as it is used for primary production, your exemption continues and the land will not be liable for land tax.

The new Land Tax Assessment now lists all South Australian property that you own, or partly own, including land that is exempt from land tax. Previous Land Tax Notice of Assessments only listed taxable land.

On your Statement of land held (which is the last page of your Assessment), you will see a code next to the land used for primary production in the ‘Site Value’ column if it is exempt from land tax. If we have recorded it as used for the business of primary production, you will see the code ‘PPEX’ beside your property.

Highlighting primary production residence exemption on statement of land

If land listed on your Statement of land held is used for the business of primary production and you do not currently have an exemption in place, please see our land tax exemption page for details on exemptions and how to apply.

Has my exemption been removed?

No. No existing exemptions were removed as part of the land tax changes.

The new Land Tax Assessment now lists all South Australian property that you own, or partly own, including land that is exempt from land tax. Previous Land Tax Notice of Assessments only listed taxable land.

If your land was already exempt from land tax, maybe as it is your home (known as your principal place of residence) or it is used for primary production, your exemption continues and the land is not liable for land tax. However it will still appear in your Land Tax Assessment with an exemption code beside the property details on your Statement of land held (the last page of your Assessment).

If the land listed on your Statement of land held does not currently have an exemption in place and you believe you are eligible, please see our land tax exemption page for details on exemptions and how to apply.

How do I apply for relief if my land tax is higher this year?

If your land tax liability has risen between $2,500 and $102,500 in 2020-21, due to the change in aggregation assessment methods you may be eligible for relief.

The value of relief will be calculated on the difference between land tax payable, compared to the land tax that would have been payable on the relevant land under the aggregation approach, tax rates and thresholds that applied in 2019-20. Applications for relief must be lodged online by 31 March 2021.

Visit the Transitional Relief page for more information and eligibility, including how to apply.

I hold land on trust, what does this mean for the Land Tax Assessment?

Land you hold on trust may be taxed at the Trust land tax rates, which includes a surcharge of up to 0.5% on the general land tax rates and a lower threshold of $25,000.

Please see our land held on trusts page for more information.

Who is the owner of land held on trust?

For land tax, the trustee is generally treated as the owner of land held on trust. The land is assessed in a separate ownership from any other land the trustee owns outside of the trust.

Where beneficiaries or unitholders are nominated, they will also be treated as owners for the purposes of land tax.

What do I do if I think my Assessment is wrong?

The main reasons your Land Tax Assessment could be different to what you estimated or expected:

  • Your site value is different to what you expected.
  • The land listed on your Land Tax Assessment are not a complete list of all the land you own, or partly own.
  • You do not own some or all of the land listed on your Land Tax Assessment.

If your site value is different to what you expected, you will need to contact the Office of the Valuer-General in relation to this. We use values provided to us by the Valuer-General when calculating land tax.

If you think your Assessment is wrong for any other reason, we have an online form where you can lodge queries or concerns about your Land Tax Assessment.

Please have your ownership number or assessment number with you when you complete the form.

I own land on trust, why does it appear on my individual Land Tax Assessment?

Where RevenueSA has not been notified of the trust ownership of land, the land will appear in the trustee’s ownership (as per the registered ownership details on the Title for the land)

Trustees are obligated to tell RevenueSA where they hold land on behalf of a trust within 30 days of acquiring the land.

See land held on trusts page for more information.

How are corporate groups billed for land tax?

Where corporations are related, all the land that the corporations own is grouped together and assessed for land tax as though all the land is owned by one corporation (other than land held by a corporation as trustee of a trust). The Land Tax Assessment is sent to the Corporation Group Head.

Other corporations within the group may also be able to access the Assessment online. Information on how to access the Assessment online will be updated to our website soon.

Is all land held on trust subject to the trust land tax rates?

Only discretionary trusts, fixed trusts and unit trusts are liable for the trust land tax rates. Other types of trusts are excepted from the trust rates and will be taxed at general land tax rates.

See land held on trusts page for more information.

Why has my apartment been taxed? I don't have any land.

While you may not have any physical land, your apartment is built on land and a site value is determined for each apartment by the Valuer-General. This site value may still attract land tax.

Why have I received a Land Tax Assessment for my unit/townhouse etc.?

As the owner of the unit/townhouse etc., you are seen as the owner for land tax purposes,

A site value is determined by the Valuer-General for each unit/townhouse., which is used to assess land tax.

If your unit/townhouse is owned under a strata title or a community title, your site value will not include common property (for example shared driveways). The relevant community or strata corporation will be liable for any common land that attracts land tax.

Why have I received a Land Tax Assessment for my shack site?

As the holder of a shack site lease, you are seen as the owner for land tax purposes.

The lessee (holder of the lease) has been recognised as the owner for land tax purposes since 1989. This means your shack site may be assessed along with any other land you own for land tax.

My question isn’t answered above. Where can I go for information?

If you have any questions which aren’t answered here, we have an online form where you can lodge queries about your Land Tax Assessment. You will receive an email response from the specialist team about your query.